Welcome to Fall Feast number 1 as seen through the eyes of a Christian!

 

What is The Feast of Trumpets?

The Feast of Trumpets, also known as Rosh Hashana or Yom Teruah, is widely known as the Jewish new year. It’s partially because this time of year is significant in terms of renewal, re-dedication, and rebirth.

There’s something about a trumpet, that when it blasts, it awakens something in your soul.

The Feast of Trumpets is the opening preparation for the coming of the Lord Jesus. For thousands of years, even before Jesus was born, Jewish people have been rehearsing and preparing for the moment the God of Israel would usher them into eternity with Him.

Why is it important?

The trumpet sound reminds us of the reality that Jesus is coming again. Knowing that eternity and judgement is real can be a sobering thought, because it reminds us that what we do in this life matters.

At the trumpet (shofar) blast, the people of God come together to worship and pray. The Feast of Trumpets first guides us in a time of repentance, or the Hebrew word teshuvah. This is a big season of introspection. It’s a time to look back on the year and inspect our hearts, our words, our actions, and our decisions and face them in all their glory and ugliness.

The good news is, when you repent, you can be washed of all the ugliness in your life through the blood of Jesus (1 John 1:9).

What can we do?

What in your life needs to be cleansed? Is your thought-life dark and getting darker? Are you treating people with kindness, compassion, and love, or are you treating them with disrespect, selfishness, and hate? Are there things in your life that you hold higher than God? Have you been drifting away from Him ever so slowly this year only to find yourself in a rut you can’t seem to get out of?

I know these are things I come up against in my heart, and if you do too, maybe now is the time to make a change.

Not only is this a time of introspection, but it’s also a time of settling debts, seeking forgiveness from the people you’ve wronged, and forgiving those who’ve wronged you. It’s a time of making the negative things in your life right, and that alone can be so freeing.

Is it based in Scripture?

To observe this feast, my family and a few others had a dinner to discuss the themes of this holy day and appreciate the importance of the customs. We take turns reading the Scripture associated with the feast.

Feel free to check out the verses listed below!

Leviticus 23:24-25

Isaiah 27:13

Zechariah 9:14

1 Kings 1:34

Nehemiah 8:2-3

1 Thessalonians 4:16

Numbers 10:9-10, 29:1

Matthew 6:14

Psalm 81

 

My personal application

I collected a few stones with smooth and flat surfaces. I passed them out to the family and told them that it was a representation of their sin. We could use the stone to pray over our sins, or we could carry it to symbolize the unnecessary baggage we carry every day. I chose to paint symbols on my stone that represented my specific struggles. Every time I looked at it, I was reminded of the areas in my life that I needed to work on with God.

I really liked the physical representation of my sins so I could focus on repenting from them and look forward to Jesus taking them away. I’ll get into that more with my article on The Day of Atonement, Fall Feast number 2.

Not all holy days are meant for celebration, but know we’re always working toward the goal of forever celebrating our Lord in eternity. I do believe that these days are meant for our good, designed for us to practice being sanctified by Jesus and to live in that freedom and love by sharing it with others.

Reach out to the person you hurt, pray for the person who has damaged you, and pay back the money your friends lent. Make something right today. It’s never too late.

 

God bless!

LJM

2 thoughts on “The Feast of Trumpets: The Jewish ‘New Year, New Me’

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