Godly Conduct in a Not-So Godly Job part 2

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In a previous blog, we discussed how to honor God with a career that’s not necessarily Christian. Now, we get into the nitty gritty as we answer the question: What do we do when we work in an environment that doesn’t support Godly principles and people who don’t believe the same way we do?

This is probably a situation that most of us will fall into when following a career path. If we’re not careful, we can find ourselves blending in with a toxic environment and fail to be the light that Jesus wants us to be. So, if you want to know how you can “do everything for the glory of God,” here are some helpful tips.

  • Respect those in higher positions (Romans 13:5)

We may not always agree with how our bosses choose to run the show, but they’re the ones who have been placed in authority for whatever reason. The more respect given, the more respect earned. Remember, the truest testament of respect is when it’s demonstrated without the person present.

  • Watch what you say (Ephesians 4:29)

Nothing hurts you faster than your own words. One statement in poor taste can damage your reputation, your relationships, and your witness. It’s wise to practice self-control when it comes to what you say. Being true to yourself doesn’t mean saying whatever you want. People speak with enough negativity to last several lifetimes. You should be the one to speak with encouragement, compassion, and love.

  • Dial down the complaints (Philippians 2:14)

The verse is self-explanatory. Don’t complain. Don’t argue. People say they don’t want to work in a drama-filled environment, yet it’s amazing how much drama we still find in our workplaces. Sometimes it can be boiled down to those two traits. If you remember Who you’re doing the work for, maybe that will help when the job frustrations eat at you. Praise the Lord for your job—you have it because He blessed you with it.

  • Be honest (Proverbs 12:22)

The Bible says let your yes be yes and your no be no. No gray areas. Let your work be just as honest and your words just as sure. Because one day, someone will come against you and your integrity (or lack thereof) will speak for itself. Be the person your managers and coworkers can trust.

It doesn’t take long to realize the importance of these qualities in someone especially in the workplace. What you need to ask yourself is what kind of employee do you want to be? What kind of Christian do you want to be?

You don’t always need to stand on your desk chair and proclaim Jesus to the office. You don’t need to carry the thickest Bible you have under your arm everywhere you go. You can, however, always ask God to give you opportunities to shine His light, because He will. In the meantime, walk, talk, and work according to His Word and you will give Him the most honor wherever you are.

God bless!

-LJM

More than a Writing Conference

Decked in a blazer with a briefcase hanging by my side, I passed a small sign that read “Write2Ignite.”

My first writer’s conference.

I hoped and prayed for opportunity, knowledge, and experience that waited behind the glass doors. By the end of the conference, I received all and more.

Anyone who hopes to hone their craft and bring their writing into the light is told to attend these conferences. The thought has always stirred up a level of anxiety for me. It means going to a new place, connecting with strangers, and even pitching my ideas to potential publishers. To some, that may be one of the most exciting aspects of the job, but for me it’s slightly nauseating.

Not every writer’s conference holds the same experience, but I’d like to share a little about what this conference did for me.

1. It forced me to be prepared

There is such a thing as being too chill. I signed up for the conference a little late and I was quickly overwhelmed. It’s best to research the presenters, editors, and publishing houses that will be attending so you don’t walk in there completely surprised with no direction. You also should be aware of certain things you should bring such as questions, a one-sheet of your idea or story, business cards, and a medium to take notes on. These things may have overwhelmed me at first, but they proved to be very helpful once I was there.

2. It gave me excellent resources

Conferences have beaucoup number of books, brochures, pamplets, and business cards of a wide variety of writing resources. You can learn about different organizations, publishing options, editing help, and more just by grabbing what they have available. I don’t know if I would’ve ever learned about some of these sources otherwise. Now they’re all stuffed in a folder for future reference.

3. It pushed me to make connections

The introvert in me has to constantly suppress the uncomfortable feeling of meeting new people. I was lucky to have had a few familiar faces at the conference to help guide me through the process. Regardless of who was there, I needed to get over myself and establish a connection with people, introduce myself, and ask questions. You’ll miss out on a lot if you decide to be the silent wanderer of the conference that no one knows. It’s not the best marketing tool either. Luckily, I stuck out my hand, asked for a few autographs, and joined in conversations, all without dying.

4. It surrounded me with like-minded people

Seminars that keep your attention are typically the ones that focus on your passion. Knowing that I was sitting with people who have similar goals and dreams made me feel submerged within my element. Plus, it’s not necessarily difficult to talk with these people because we all share something in common: The power of stories being or waiting to be told.

5. It gave me experience

Not only do I have one conference under my belt, I also have a couple of pitching sessions too. A pitching session is when you meet with a publisher, editor, or agent to discuss your story whether it’s fully written or not. Those sessions help you gain experience to better hone your pitch and open the door for possible publishing opportunities. You also can discover more about yourself as a writer and who you’re writing for during those sessions.

6. It gave me encouragement

This conference was filled with gracious speakers and presenters, saturated in the love of God and dripping with the faith that His hand will guide all of us. If I can steal what one of our keynote speakers, Lisa Albinus pointed out in the miracle feeding of the 5000, Jesus said to the disciples “You give them something to eat.”

God has given us a story. Many stories. Some of these come from the God-given gift of imagination, others comes from life experience. Either way, if we have felt His calling, we must equip ourselves to use these talents to give to the world. To limit ourselves by saying we’re not good enough or there’s no way we’ll be published is to limit God’s glory and to forsake what He’s equipped us to give.

“You give them something to eat.”

∼Mark 6:37∼

I left the conference fully charged, connected, and one step closer to having my own dream become a reality. Mainly, I was reminded that I write because God instilled a passion in me at a young age. He’s given me a talent and the least I can do is use it to encourage people closer to Him.

If you’re struggling about what God has called you to do or how you’ll ever make a living doing something you love, remember, He knows and He will get you where you need to be. He will always equip you, you simply have to give your all. No matter what stage in the process you are, God has outlined the steps if only you trust Him.

For my fellow writers, if you’re interested in checking out Write2Ignite go to their website here.

God bless you in the journey He’s called for you.

-LJM

Proverbs 16:9